Fierce Healthcare – Provider Credentialing

Two national insurers and a Michigan health system are joining a new pilot project aimed at simplifying physician credentialing with blockchain technology.

WellCare and Spectrum Health are among the founding participants in a pilot project launched by ProCredEx, a new company backed by Hashed Health, which specializes in blockchain and distributed ledger technologies for healthcare.

National Government Services, an Anthem-owned federal contractor that processes Medicare claims for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), has also joined the pilot program alongside The Hardenberg Group and Accenture.

 

Healthcare Infomatics Blockchain Discussion – MultiPlan – ProCredEx – Hashed Health – C3

In Nashville, a Candid Discussion of the Potential for Blockchain in Healthcare

July 10, 2018

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What are the realistic prospects for the adoption of blockchain technologies in U.S. healthcare? The opportunities exist, but so do seemingly countless complexities. On June 28 at the Sheraton Nashville Downtown, experts and innovators around blockchain shared their perspectives on the subject, during the Health IT Summit in Nashville, sponsored by Healthcare Informatics.

Giles Ward, COO of Hashed Health, a Nashville-based “healthcare innovation firm focused on accelerating the meaningful development of blockchain and distributed ledger technologies,”led the panel discussion, entitled “Use Cases for Blockchain in Healthcare.” He was joined by David Murtagh, vice president of operations, provider data management, at MultiPlan, a New York City-based company that “helps healthcare payers manage the cost of care, improve their competitiveness and inspire positive change”; he was also joined by Anthony Begando, CEO of the Nashville-based Professional Credentials Exchange, or ProCredEx, which provides systemic professional credentials verification services; and by Jeanine Martin, nurse advocate and clinical information leader at C3 Global Biosciences, Inc., a Las Vegas-based research firm involved in cannbidiol (CBD; medical marijuana) development and distribution.

Ward began by asking Murtagh about his perspectives on the research and development work done on blockchain in healthcare in the past two years. “Two years is actually a long timeframe to look back on,” Murtagh said. “We’re fortunate enough, because of the relationships we have, most of the partners are relatively small. United, United Health Group. Optum, Humana, and Quest Diagnostics, collaborative. There’s a relationship factor. United might have a really good relationship with a set of providers, that we don’t have. It’s not like there are certain provider groups out there that say we’re going to shun certain health plans. I believe that the real trigger for this industry to collaborate and use a technology like B that’s relatively unproven, has been driven by regulations. CMS started auditing provider directories of health plans, and for the commercial health plans, CMS has delegated the requirements to the states for audit requirements. And every state has done something different.”

 

Read the full article here: Healthcare Infomatics

June 2018 Nashville Blockchain Meetup – MultiPlan

 

The June 2018 Nashville Blockchain Meetup was an encapsulation of everything that makes the time and energy invested in Meetups worth while.  In partnership the Health IT Summit Series the Nashville Blockchain Meetup and all conference attendees were invited to an informal discussion at the Nashville Technology Council about the recently announced healthcare blockchain pilot program involving Optum, United HealthcareQuest Diagnostics, Humana, and MultiPlan.   As we await the release of the much anticipated whitepaper, details have been hard to come by,  so were thrilled to welcome David Murtagh who serves as  MultiPlan’s Vice President of Operations over Provider Data Management.  David offered a grounded, non-technical look at Multiplan’s approach to the technology, why they chose to participate, and the challenges of convening a network among industry peers and sometimes competitors.   Provider directory management is a fluid and complex.  He gave estimates drawn from their 2.5 million provider entries showing that 2-3% of the data changes every month which compounds to almost 50% of the data in a given directory turning over every 18 months.

At Hashed Health, we have long seen Provider Directories as a perfect early use case for blockchain – the data is unregulated and non-competitive.  For HIMSS 2017, we built a provider directory prototype on an early release of Fabric as a working example of what was possible with blockchain.   Relate-able  use cases and networks of known players are key as the industry looks for reasons to say yes to blockchain – this project is exactly that.

We are grateful for our partnership with Richard Tomko and Stephen McCollum at Healthcare Infomatics for bringing David Murtagh and Multiplan to Nashville for the events.  Please listen to the audio or watch the video of the meetup below.

 

 

See the article in Forbes:  “United Healthcare, Optum, Humana, MultiPlan and Quest Diagnostics launch blockchain provider director pilot

 

Audio Podcast of Meetup:

Video Recording of Meetup (sorry about the back lighting)


@MeetupNashville

@HCInformatics

 

 

July 2018 Nashville Blockchain Meetup – Music Night

Blockchain and DLT has the potential to change the way music is sold and consumed. Over time, new technical and business models will affect how rights holders (labels, producers, musicians, other artists) interact with each other and with fans.  In July we heard from Jesse Grushack, co-founder of UJO Music and their rights management system.   We also heard a Nashville innovators perspective from Chris McMurtry head of  Head of Music Product at Exactuals and Lee Greer President of NPREX a blockchain backed performing rights exchange.

 

Audio Podcast:

Twitter Livestream Recording:

https://www.pscp.tv/w/1YqGognaaRkGv

Thank you to our friends at PioPlay Livestream for the seamlessly professional live stream coverage (we loved them, they are awesome – consider us a standing reference for their work)

Making the Healthcare System Work

Blockchain has been touted as a way to track diamonds or even prevent counterfeit goods — and the hype has spread to health care.

A blockchain is essentially a database in the form of what’s called a distributed ledger. That is, information is distributed across a network of participants. The participants can see activity on the ledger, but no single party controls it. Once data is in the blockchain, it can’t be changed. New information is timestamped and linked to the previous entries, making the blockchain auditable and secure.

Blockchain is probably best known as the technology that supports bitcoin, but its potential goes well beyond cryptocurrency. Innovators see promise in using a trusted, shared database of transactions for payments and money transfers, records and verification, to reduce risk and fraud.

The technology, while still evolving, is becoming mature enough that some states have announced that blockchain would be treated similarly to existing electronic record systems. This development should encourage broader acceptance of blockchain applications.

Steve Betts, chief information officer for Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans in Illinois, Montana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas, explains why health care innovators are excited about blockchain.

 

The perfect fit

Some experts also believe blockchain has the potential to revolutionize health care.

“The reason all the hype is there is because if it works, if it’s true — if half of it is true — it has the potential to fundamentally change market structures and the movement of value,” says John Bass, founder and CEO of Hashed Health, a company focused on solving problems in health care with blockchain technology.

“There’s so much potential to improve how care is delivered and paid for, and that’s got everyone very, very excited,” Bass says. “Part of what’s driving all the cost and quality problems is fundamental issues around trust, transparency and sense of alignment.”

That’s because the health care industry has so many different parties — insurers, doctors, hospitals, consumers and more.

These groups have their own data, and it’s often a struggle to share accurate, up-to-date information in a secure way. That’s what blockchain was designed to do.

And innovators are taking notice. More blockchain initiatives are focused on health care than any other sector, according to a report from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Bass is particularly excited about blockchain’s potential to shift the health care industry toward true value-based care — paying for care that improves patients’ well being and rewarding physicians for quality instead of the quantity of services they provide.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: LINK

Tipping Point: The Transformation of America’s Healthcare System

We are accelerating towards a healthcare financial crisis in the US.  For many families, it’s already here. In the last 10 years, US healthcare prices are up 22% (vs 17% for the general economy). US Healthcare expenditures are up 45% (vs 28% for the general economy). We have institutionalized a dangerous marketplace known for a lack of competition, obscure pricing and contracting, high administrative costs, and the consumer’s willingness to pay without asking questions or having answers.

The winners have leveraged the current design to profit in an irrational market.  Pricing variation, over-consumption and administrative waste are all someone’s profit margin.  These companies are emboldened by the infrastructure-heavy business processes that persist in healthcare.  These models rely on centralization of data and business models that aggregate and leverage consumer data for profit.

This will not continue another ten years.  The government, employers and patient customers are at a breaking point.  There is a crisis of confidence in foundational healthcare systems. There will be a dramatic shift, either forced or voluntary.

In March, Alex Azar of the HHS outlined his policy that focuses on empowering patients with their data, transparent pricing, value-based market structures, and removing government influences that impede value-based health. He told the Federation of American Hospitals, “There is no turning back to an unsustainable system that pays for procedures rather than value. In fact, the only option is to charge forward — for HHS to take bolder action, and for providers and payers to join with us. This administration and this President are not interested in incremental steps. We are unafraid of disrupting existing arrangements simply because they’re backed by powerful special interests.”

In response to these pressures we have discovered a potential answer.  Recently entrepreneurs and incumbents in the healthcare industry have embarked on an inviting new conversation that has the potential to, over time, fundamentally change our healthcare delivery model.  A growing community sees the chance of a lifetime to improve how healthcare is accessed, delivered and paid for. Work is underway to transform delivery through the convergence of healthcare blockchain, IoT, AI, machine learning, mobile devices, telehealth and precision medicine.  This technology cocktail leverages a disruptive combination of trust, transparency, behavioral economics, big data and automation. The hope is that we may enable the restructuring of inefficient, ineffective, corporate-focused value chains in healthcare.  Doing so could change the market structure under the feet of healthcare companies around the world.

Blockchain provides the foundation for this change.  Most people see blockchain as a new technology, often referred to as the “Internet of Value.”  What most people don’t understand is that its power for value-transfer disruption lies in the enablement of new business models and the blockchain’s ability to embed belief systems in to the software itself.  This combination of open source technology innovation, business model innovation and governance innovation makes it challenging to get right, yet potentially very rewarding for those who use it effectively.

Most people have not spent the time and energy to fully understand the convergence that is happening.  It takes a lot of work to fully understand the opportunities presented when you bring together new business models, new technical models and new governance structures.

With all the hype, it’s healthy to be skeptical.  Whether or not you believe in the technology, you have to admit that emergence of blockchain is creating an amazing opportunity to collaborate in new ways.  Collaboration begins with communication around ideas.  These ideas represent a refreshing new conversation in healthcare. It gives us a chance to imagine a world where we can stop repeating the mistakes of the past and stop repeating the same conversations around the obstacles that stand in the way of empowering patients, transparency, interoperability, value, and irrational market forces in healthcare.

For good reason healthcare is resistant to change.  Transformation won’t be easy.  In fact, it has never been done before. It will require us to shift our paradigm from a model that rewards the centralized business models that underpin many of the largest healthcare companies today.  It will require us to double-down on the shift from volume to value.  It will ask us to trust software protocols where we formerly trusted companies and middle-men.

In return, we can expect to see new ecosystems in healthcare arise that are in line with the needs of patients, employers and other communities.  These ecosystems will center around new types of market structures that provide more efficient access to health resources.  These new markets hold the promise of rationality and transparency.  Consumers can make choices based on information, cost, and a seller’s reputation for delivering value.  Innovative offerings can be listed on new exchanges by innovative sellers that reflect the needs of innovative buyers like the VA or Amazon, JP Morgan, and Berkshire Hathaway.

To succeed, we will use a variety of new distributed and decentralized protocols that embody the belief systems of their creators who come together around solving the industry-level problems borne of centralization. These parties (new and old) have already begun to collaborate and offer an alternative to healthcare’s current value chains that keep us locked in 1990’s-era pipelined processes where rent-seeking rules the day.  We are already building ground-up economies that use programmable value transfer to automatically respond to behavior, quality and outcomes.  We will no longer need to depend on infrastructure (ex. claims) that is not designed to support the important relationship between cost and quality.

The winning innovators will differentiate themselves based on trust, value and collaboration.  Across the globe, “minimally viable networks” are coming together to test production systems that solve old problems in new ways.  The early use cases focus on physician identity, patient identity, claims adjudication, consent, supply chain and payments.

Experts will tell you it’s just a matter of time.  It will happen network-by-network over the next ten years or so.  The decentralizing forces that have been unleashed cannot be held back.  Hiding from these realities is akin to hiding from the internet in 1999, but even more dangerous.  In the 90’s we were changing the container of the flow of information. Today we are changing the container of the movement of value and digital assets.  That’s a much bigger story that could shift the landscape in dramatic ways.  There will be companies who ignore the shifting market structures under their feet, possibly resulting in a new corporate extinction event in a relatively short period of time.

That might be what it takes to right-size a system that has outlived its design.  It also just might be our only viable alternative to the next US financial crisis.

John Bass is the Founder & CEO of Hashed Health, a healthcare innovation firm that focuses on using blockchain and distributed ledger technologies to solve unmet needs in healthcare.

Tampa Blockchain Innovation Challenge

Announcing the inaugural Tampa Blockchain Innovation Challenge!

Hashed Health and the Professional Credentials Exchange have partnered with Synapse and Blockspaces to develop this Challenge as a means of assisting members of the technical and innovation communities in central Florida to learn more about this rapidly emerging technology.  While blockchain has been largely associated with cryptocurrencies, a massive push is being made across virtually all industries to create applications leveraging this technology to transform value chains.  The healthcare industry is fraught with transactional friction in virtually every operational niche existing within the market.  Blockchain technology is poised to disrupt and transform a number of areas, such as practitioner identity and credentialing, claims and payment settlement, patient medical records, clinical trial data management, supply track/trace, and so on.   This Challenge will focus on creating a blockchain-based application demonstrating the collection and reporting of personal wellness data from IoT devices (e.g., pedometers, scales, fitness tracking apps)—providing sponsors of wellness programs (e.g., employers, health plans, trainers) with a simple and intuitive application to “visualize” the provenance and lifecycle of that data.

The challenge will be limited to teams of up to five members experienced in modern software engineering tools & techniques (e.g., UX, C++/#, Java, Python).   Blockspaces will be providing two 90-minute complimentary Ethereum/Solidity training courses at their location in South Tampa to all invited teams participating in the Challenge.   Thereafter, teams will be given several weeks to design and develop their applications and submit them for review.  On July 31, teams will present their solutions and a winner will be selected by a panel of blockchain experts.  The winning team will be awarded $3,000.00

Please share this note within your networks and with individuals you feel may be interested in participating.   Registration is open to teams from any type of organization (corporations, universities, meetup groups) whose members meet the requisite baseline technology experience.

Interested parties can apply directly within the Synapse platform here:  http://bit.ly/BlockchainChallenge .

Important Dates:

June 5 – Challenge Announcement

June 18 – Team Submission Deadline

June 19 – Training Session 1

June 26 – Training Session 2

July 20 – Solution Submission Deadline

July 31 – Presentations and Awards

Register Here

Blockchain Healthcare | Hashed Health

May Nashville Blockchain MeetUp – Radar Relay

On May 23, the Nashville Blockchain Meetup and Ethereum Nashville hosted Radar Relay at a combined Meetup.  The event was hosted by WeWork and sponsored by Hashed HealthBTC Media, Frost Brown Todd, and our newest supporter LBMC.

Thanks to Blake Pedersen for coordinating the speaker.

Connor Herman Director of Token Analysis at Radar Relay came in from Denver Colorado to discuss their platform.  He walked the assembled crowd through the different kinds of exchanges and how a relay is different.  He then went into the Radar Relay offering and the 0X protocol before talking about the future of decentralized exchanges.  The audience was not short of  questions ranging from liquidity challenges and arbitrage opportunities to the not unexpected probes into trust and transparency assumptions.  You can see the full presentation on the youtube link below.

A few links from the presentation and announcements:

You can always find more information and continue the discussion at https://chat.hashedhealth.com on the #Nashville Blockchain Meetup channel.