Tag Archive for: John Bass

July 2018 Nashville Blockchain Meetup – Music Night

Blockchain and DLT has the potential to change the way music is sold and consumed. Over time, new technical and business models will affect how rights holders (labels, producers, musicians, other artists) interact with each other and with fans.  In July we heard from Jesse Grushack, co-founder of UJO Music and their rights management system.   We also heard a Nashville innovators perspective from Chris McMurtry head of  Head of Music Product at Exactuals and Lee Greer President of NPREX a blockchain backed performing rights exchange.

 

Audio Podcast:

Twitter Livestream Recording:

https://www.pscp.tv/w/1YqGognaaRkGv

Thank you to our friends at PioPlay Livestream for the seamlessly professional live stream coverage (we loved them, they are awesome – consider us a standing reference for their work)

Making the Healthcare System Work

Blockchain has been touted as a way to track diamonds or even prevent counterfeit goods — and the hype has spread to health care.

A blockchain is essentially a database in the form of what’s called a distributed ledger. That is, information is distributed across a network of participants. The participants can see activity on the ledger, but no single party controls it. Once data is in the blockchain, it can’t be changed. New information is timestamped and linked to the previous entries, making the blockchain auditable and secure.

Blockchain is probably best known as the technology that supports bitcoin, but its potential goes well beyond cryptocurrency. Innovators see promise in using a trusted, shared database of transactions for payments and money transfers, records and verification, to reduce risk and fraud.

The technology, while still evolving, is becoming mature enough that some states have announced that blockchain would be treated similarly to existing electronic record systems. This development should encourage broader acceptance of blockchain applications.

Steve Betts, chief information officer for Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans in Illinois, Montana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas, explains why health care innovators are excited about blockchain.

 

The perfect fit

Some experts also believe blockchain has the potential to revolutionize health care.

“The reason all the hype is there is because if it works, if it’s true — if half of it is true — it has the potential to fundamentally change market structures and the movement of value,” says John Bass, founder and CEO of Hashed Health, a company focused on solving problems in health care with blockchain technology.

“There’s so much potential to improve how care is delivered and paid for, and that’s got everyone very, very excited,” Bass says. “Part of what’s driving all the cost and quality problems is fundamental issues around trust, transparency and sense of alignment.”

That’s because the health care industry has so many different parties — insurers, doctors, hospitals, consumers and more.

These groups have their own data, and it’s often a struggle to share accurate, up-to-date information in a secure way. That’s what blockchain was designed to do.

And innovators are taking notice. More blockchain initiatives are focused on health care than any other sector, according to a report from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Bass is particularly excited about blockchain’s potential to shift the health care industry toward true value-based care — paying for care that improves patients’ well being and rewarding physicians for quality instead of the quantity of services they provide.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: LINK

Hashed Health Newsletter June 26 2018

 

 

 

Tipping Point: The Transformation of America’s Healthcare System

We are accelerating towards a healthcare financial crisis in the US.  For many families, it’s already here. In the last 10 years, US healthcare prices are up 22% (vs 17% for the general economy). US Healthcare expenditures are up 45% (vs 28% for the general economy). We have institutionalized a dangerous marketplace known for a lack of competition, obscure pricing and contracting, high administrative costs, and the consumer’s willingness to pay without asking questions or having answers.

The winners have leveraged the current design to profit in an irrational market.  Pricing variation, over-consumption and administrative waste are all someone’s profit margin.  These companies are emboldened by the infrastructure-heavy business processes that persist in healthcare.  These models rely on centralization of data and business models that aggregate and leverage consumer data for profit.

This will not continue another ten years.  The government, employers and patient customers are at a breaking point.  There is a crisis of confidence in foundational healthcare systems. There will be a dramatic shift, either forced or voluntary.

In March, Alex Azar of the HHS outlined his policy that focuses on empowering patients with their data, transparent pricing, value-based market structures, and removing government influences that impede value-based health. He told the Federation of American Hospitals, “There is no turning back to an unsustainable system that pays for procedures rather than value. In fact, the only option is to charge forward — for HHS to take bolder action, and for providers and payers to join with us. This administration and this President are not interested in incremental steps. We are unafraid of disrupting existing arrangements simply because they’re backed by powerful special interests.”

In response to these pressures we have discovered a potential answer.  Recently entrepreneurs and incumbents in the healthcare industry have embarked on an inviting new conversation that has the potential to, over time, fundamentally change our healthcare delivery model.  A growing community sees the chance of a lifetime to improve how healthcare is accessed, delivered and paid for. Work is underway to transform delivery through the convergence of healthcare blockchain, IoT, AI, machine learning, mobile devices, telehealth and precision medicine.  This technology cocktail leverages a disruptive combination of trust, transparency, behavioral economics, big data and automation. The hope is that we may enable the restructuring of inefficient, ineffective, corporate-focused value chains in healthcare.  Doing so could change the market structure under the feet of healthcare companies around the world.

Blockchain provides the foundation for this change.  Most people see blockchain as a new technology, often referred to as the “Internet of Value.”  What most people don’t understand is that its power for value-transfer disruption lies in the enablement of new business models and the blockchain’s ability to embed belief systems in to the software itself.  This combination of open source technology innovation, business model innovation and governance innovation makes it challenging to get right, yet potentially very rewarding for those who use it effectively.

Most people have not spent the time and energy to fully understand the convergence that is happening.  It takes a lot of work to fully understand the opportunities presented when you bring together new business models, new technical models and new governance structures.

With all the hype, it’s healthy to be skeptical.  Whether or not you believe in the technology, you have to admit that emergence of blockchain is creating an amazing opportunity to collaborate in new ways.  Collaboration begins with communication around ideas.  These ideas represent a refreshing new conversation in healthcare. It gives us a chance to imagine a world where we can stop repeating the mistakes of the past and stop repeating the same conversations around the obstacles that stand in the way of empowering patients, transparency, interoperability, value, and irrational market forces in healthcare.

For good reason healthcare is resistant to change.  Transformation won’t be easy.  In fact, it has never been done before. It will require us to shift our paradigm from a model that rewards the centralized business models that underpin many of the largest healthcare companies today.  It will require us to double-down on the shift from volume to value.  It will ask us to trust software protocols where we formerly trusted companies and middle-men.

In return, we can expect to see new ecosystems in healthcare arise that are in line with the needs of patients, employers and other communities.  These ecosystems will center around new types of market structures that provide more efficient access to health resources.  These new markets hold the promise of rationality and transparency.  Consumers can make choices based on information, cost, and a seller’s reputation for delivering value.  Innovative offerings can be listed on new exchanges by innovative sellers that reflect the needs of innovative buyers like the VA or Amazon, JP Morgan, and Berkshire Hathaway.

To succeed, we will use a variety of new distributed and decentralized protocols that embody the belief systems of their creators who come together around solving the industry-level problems borne of centralization. These parties (new and old) have already begun to collaborate and offer an alternative to healthcare’s current value chains that keep us locked in 1990’s-era pipelined processes where rent-seeking rules the day.  We are already building ground-up economies that use programmable value transfer to automatically respond to behavior, quality and outcomes.  We will no longer need to depend on infrastructure (ex. claims) that is not designed to support the important relationship between cost and quality.

The winning innovators will differentiate themselves based on trust, value and collaboration.  Across the globe, “minimally viable networks” are coming together to test production systems that solve old problems in new ways.  The early use cases focus on physician identity, patient identity, claims adjudication, consent, supply chain and payments.

Experts will tell you it’s just a matter of time.  It will happen network-by-network over the next ten years or so.  The decentralizing forces that have been unleashed cannot be held back.  Hiding from these realities is akin to hiding from the internet in 1999, but even more dangerous.  In the 90’s we were changing the container of the flow of information. Today we are changing the container of the movement of value and digital assets.  That’s a much bigger story that could shift the landscape in dramatic ways.  There will be companies who ignore the shifting market structures under their feet, possibly resulting in a new corporate extinction event in a relatively short period of time.

That might be what it takes to right-size a system that has outlived its design.  It also just might be our only viable alternative to the next US financial crisis.

John Bass is the Founder & CEO of Hashed Health, a healthcare innovation firm that focuses on using blockchain and distributed ledger technologies to solve unmet needs in healthcare.

Health Innovators: Let’s Get Practical, Blockchain in Healthcare

By NINA TALLEY, MedSpeaks

When it comes to blockchain in healthcare, Electronic Health Records (EHRs) dominate the conversation. The need to secure and move this highly sensitive data has long been a bottleneck in healthcare. Healthtech futurists are looking hungrily at burgeoning blockchain and related technologies as a part of the solution to this time-consuming problem. But are we truly there yet?

“Dreams of interoperability and self-sovereign medical records are nothing new,” said John Bass, CEO of Hashed Health, a healthcare innovation firm focused on developing meaningful utilization of blockchain technologies and networks. “It’s understandable that the big, disruptive blockchain use cases have captured the world’s imagination. The blockchain certainly provides an exciting new framework for these solutions. But we have to figure out how to get from here to there.”

Read the full article here: Health Innovators: Let’s Get Practical, Blockchain in Healthcare

 

Healthbox Innovation Rising Podcast

About Innovation Rising:

Innovation Rising, presented by Healthbox, examines the intersection of innovation and healthcare from a variety of viewpoints featuring interviews with the leaders who are moving our industry forward. The podcast is arranged in 3-episode series around a specific topic in healthcare or innovation. In each of the 3 episodes, we interview a hospital or health system using this innovation, an investor who has invested in this sector and their thoughts on why and the future of the sector, and finally an interview with a founder of a solution in this space, respectively.

 

In this episode:

Our guest today, John Bass, joins the podcast to talk about the use of the blockchain in healthcare and how it will drive innovation, now, and in the future. John is the Founder and CEO of Hashed Health, a healthcare blockchain innovation firm focused on building the new digital infrastructure for healthcare. John has over 20 years of experience in healthcare technology with expertise in shared operating systems that build trust, transparency, and incentives across health networks.

Prior to Hashed Health, John was CEO at InVivoLink, a care management start-up which sold to HCA in 2015. Since then, John has been a leading voice in the development of the global healthcare blockchain market and is focused on community development, enterprise services, and blockchain solutions development.

Topics we cover in this episode:

John’s background and focus on improving patient outcomes

When the blockchain actually came to be and when and why it piqued John’s interest

What the blockchain is

The types of problems using the blockchain in healthcare aims to solve and how Hashed Health aims to accelerate this process

How the blockchain will truly be disruptive in healthcare

Catalyst – Listening in (with permission) Podcast

 

Suzanne Delbanco, Executive Director of Catalyst for Payment Reform dials John Bass, Founder and CEO of Hashed Health, who shares his insights on how and why blockchain can reduce costs, create trust, and improve competition in health care. Listen in as he breaks down what healthcare blockchain is and how, as a data infrastructure, it can reduce friction in different health care value chains like bundled payment and provider credentialing. If you’re hearing about blockchain and want to know what it means for health care purchasers, this episode is for you!

 

 

 

 

 

Red Hot Healthcare Podcast

blockchain healthcare podcast

Red Host Healthcare Episode 67

Hashing Out Blockchain in Healthcare with John Bass

Blockchain has been perhaps the biggest buzzword over the last year. But what about it IS hype…and what is the truth today, and likely for the future? And for healthcare?

In this episode, Dr. Ambrose’s guest is John Bass, the CEO of Hashed Health in Nashville, TN with us in studio. He’s taking us down the primrose path, where we can smell the roses and not get stuck by its thorns.

In this engaging and information-packed episode, host Dr. Steve and John discuss:

  • A quick primer on the technology
  • New business models and value chain governance
  • Impact on administrative costs
  • Professional Credentials Exchange, Bramble and other powerful emerging solutions
  • Blockchain enabling consumerism and a new era of competing on price and quality
  • Trust, transparency, and incentive alignment
  • And so much more!

Full podcast and info here: https://redhothealthcare.com/hashing

IDN Summit – Transformations Track Audio Recording

Monday, April 16, 2018
blockchain healthcare
According to research conducted by the University of Chicago, the healthcare industry will see a 21% increase in IT jobs by 2020, as technological advances increase the demand for the use of health informatics, mobile technology, cloud systems, and digital diagnostics.  Advanced technologies such as blockchain, artificial intelligence and machine learning are game-changers and can now be used for more secure services, enhanced patient care, better diagnoses, improved supply chain management, and more.  These technologies have the potential to save time and minimize the potential for added costs and human error, but is your organization ready for the transformations they are sure to bring as we enter the digital age?
Technological breakthroughs are revolutionizing the way healthcare is being delivered and the quality and accuracy of that care.  But technology affects much more than just the delivery of care.  Healthcare workers want to know how technology change their jobs and how to prepare for those inevitable changes.  How can you stay abreast of these changes when technology advances are being made at an incredible rate?   What is the potential for additional regulations resulting from the use of these technologies and how can your staff be prepared to meet them?  Chris Holt will discuss how many of these technologies will be impacting the healthcare supply chain and how you can prepare your organization to capitalize on their potential.
Deloitte executives estimate that the healthcare industry will see an aggressive deployment of blockchain, with nearly 35 percent planning to deploy some usage of blockchain in 2018.  One of the primary benefits of blockchain is its security for recording and tracking assets.  However, blockchain is also improving patient safety through the tracking and tracing of regulations of pharmaceuticals and better management of patient records.  For some though, it’s still a foreign language. John Bass will discuss the steps necessary to roll out blockchain with little to no disruption and with C-Suite and staff engagement, understanding and support.  Hear lessons learned and tips for putting blockchain to work for you in your efforts to improve operational efficiency and profitability.  Leave this session with a better understanding of just what blockchain is and what it can do for you.
Learning Objectives: 
1. Describe how to develop strategies for implementing new technological advances in your organization.
2. Discuss what impact changing technology will have on patient care, record keeping, and healthcare careers.
3. Identify three ways that blockchain can improve workflows.

On March 26th Richard Close and Brian Hoffman of Canaccord Genuity  hosted a call to discuss blockchain in healthcare with John Bass, CEO of Hashed Health.  We can connect you if you would like to read the full report.  Canaccord Genuity Industry Update Report blockchain healthcare

Reference: Canaccord GenuityRichard Close , Brian Hoffman, John Bass